The Creative Incubator scholarship winner Gillian Adamson sees painting as a priority | Newcastle Herald

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GILLIAN Adamson is a painter looking for a “simple life, well lived”. “It was only last year, it really started, that I don’t have to have this intense career, I can just slow down and paint what I want to paint now and not wait until I’m 80.” says Adamson. Painting for Adamson took on the role of what religion was to her grandparents. By painting interiors influenced by her grandparents’ era in the 1960s and 70s, she has found a way to portray what she prioritizes in a life well lived. “I particularly like going to my grandparents’ house and looking at the paintings on the walls,” she says. “They are not paintings chosen because they are beautiful, but paintings that remind us of how to lead a good Catholic life. “There are so many different depictions of Jesus and crosses and different symbols … I paint these interiors to make fun of this time. I paint these pictures because my grandparents’ house was a place of safety and comfort. “I had this upbringing that was rooted in Catholicism, where there is this explanation for everything and that is not so obvious now, there is this search to fill the void.” This is what she found painting variations of her grandparents’ house from photographs and constructing new interiors composed of source materials found on old real estate websites, from photographs, and from life. There is satisfaction in her pictures. There is a stillness, a quiet happiness that is often lacking in our busy lives. This is what draws us into their works, the silence. Adamson really makes us notice the details. In I Don’t Need Anything Else (2021), if we take a closer look, we find that there are actually three flower vases and two fruit bowls on the table between the papers. Her arrangements are very homely and inhabited, full of household items. She uses objects that can be found in every home, and home is the place where we find comfort, where we feel safe and comfortable, and where we can be our true selves. In an Adamson painting there is no embarrassment from clutter, it is celebrated and the viewers are fascinated by what is behind that curtain or we feel related because this is the same clock we have on our living room wall. She is able to lead us into other people’s homes, where we can peer into their private spaces and find that we are all the same. We are all looking for something that gives meaning to our existence. Her work evokes memories through the use of familiar furnishings. Through her artistic work, Adamson processes her own philosophy of life, which she conveys with sensitivity and nostalgia. As a self-taught painter, she started drawing in her studies of visual communication and found abstract painting in 2017. Last year she was mentored by Australian artist Lottie Consalvo during the Newcastle Art Space mentoring program. During this time she switched to painting interior design, which today dominates her art practice. This year she is HIC Artist in Residence at the Creator Incubator. “That was one of the best things that has happened to my practice so far, having Lottie help,” she says. “I just got this clearer process that I go through to create works.” Sometimes I get stuck on things and that’s one of the perks of being here [The Creator Incubator], now I have access to all of these other artists. I can just grab someone when they walk by. “The residence gave her a 12-month studio and a fully funded solo exhibition in the TCI gallery in March 2022. Provided by the Bynon family and HIC Services, she came off perfectly on “I was working on my dining room table … having a studio was one of the things I wanted to have this year,” she says. “So it’s huge. I am very very excited. Now that I have the space, I hope to be working on more than one painting at a time, getting bigger and doing more installations, like I did for the NAS Mentorship exhibit. “You can get Gillian Adamson in her studio Visit at The Creator Incubator, Shed 15A / 50 Clyde Street, Hamilton and follow her artistic progress on Instagram @gilianclareadamson.

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GILLIAN Adamson is a painter in search of a “simple life, well lived”.

“It was only last year, it really started, that I don’t have to have this intense career, I can just slow down and paint what I want to paint now and not wait until I’m 80.” says Adamson.

Painting for Adamson took on the role of what religion was to her grandparents. By painting interiors influenced by her grandparents’ era in the 1960s and 70s, she has found a way to portray what she prioritizes in a life well lived.

“I particularly like going to my grandparents’ house and looking at the paintings on the walls,” she says. “They are not pictures chosen because they are beautiful, but pictures that remind us of how to lead a good Catholic life.

“There are so many different depictions of Jesus and crosses and different symbols … I don’t paint these interiors to make fun of that time, I paint these pictures because my grandparents’ house was a place of safety and comfort.

HOMESPUN: Adamsons

HOMESPUN: Adamson’s “I Don’t Need Anything Else”.

“I had this upbringing that was rooted in Catholicism, where there is this explanation for everything and that is not so obvious now, there is this search to fill the void.”

This is what she found painting variations of her grandparents’ house from photographs and constructing new interiors composed of source materials found on old real estate websites, from photographs, and from life.

There is satisfaction in her pictures. There is a stillness, a quiet happiness that is often lacking in our busy lives. This is what draws us into their works, the silence.

Adamson really makes us notice the details. In I Don’t Need Anything Else (2021), if we take a closer look, we find that there are actually three flower vases and two fruit bowls on the table between the papers.

Your arrangements are very homely and inhabited, full of household items. She uses objects that can be found in every home, and home is the place where we find comfort, where we feel safe and comfortable, and where we can be our true selves.

In an Adamson painting there is no embarrassment from clutter, it is celebrated and the viewers are fascinated by what is behind that curtain or we feel related because this is the same clock we have on our living room wall. She can take us into other people’s homes, where we can look into their private rooms and find that we are all the same.

IMPORTANT: 'Seek (a simple, well-lived life)'.

IMPORTANT: ‘Seek (a simple, well-lived life)’.

We are all looking for something that gives meaning to our existence. Her work evokes memories through the use of familiar furnishings. Through her artistic work, Adamson processes her own philosophy of life, which she conveys with sensitivity and nostalgia.

As a self-taught painter, she started drawing in her studies of visual communication and found abstract painting in 2017. Last year she was mentored by Australian artist Lottie Consalvo during the Newcastle Art Space mentoring program. During this time she switched to painting interior design, which today dominates her art practice. This year she is HIC Artist in Residence at the Creator Incubator.

“That was one of the best things that has happened to my practice so far, having Lottie help,” she says. “I just got this clearer process that I go through to create works.

“Sometimes I get stuck with things and that’s one of the advantages of being here [The Creator Incubator], now I have access to all of these other artists. I can just grab someone when they go by. ”

In March 2022, the residence gave her a 12-month studio and a fully financed solo exhibition in the TCI gallery. Courtesy of the Bynon Family and HIC Services, her timing came at the perfect time for Adamson.

“I was working on my dining room table … having a studio was one of the things I wanted this year,” she says. “So it’s huge. I’m very, very excited. Now that I have the space, I’m hoping to be working on more than one painting at a time, getting bigger, and doing more installations like I did for the NAS mentor exhibition have done.”

You can visit Gillian Adamson at her studio at The Creator Incubator, Shed 15A / 50 Clyde Street, Hamilton and follow her artistic progress on Instagram @gillianclareadamson.

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