Goldie painting stolen in Waikato burglary worth ‘well over $500,000’

One of the items stolen from the Hamilton East home was a painting by CF Goldie.

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One of the items stolen from the Hamilton East home was a painting by CF Goldie.

A painting believed to be an original by one of New Zealand’s most famous artists was stolen in a break-in in Hamilton.

Waikato Police are looking for information related to the break-in in Hamilton East, including a painting titled Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing by New Zealand artist Charles Frederick Goldie, as well as numerous other unique works of art and antiques.

Police believe it occurred in the Hamilton East area between December 27, 2020 and January 3, 2021. Other stolen items were a cutlery set from Koch & Bergfeld.

In a photo of the stolen painting, Webb’s art director Charles Ninow said the piece was an original worth “well over half a million dollars”.

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Lady with Red Hat Painting.

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Lady with Red Hat Painting.

“It’s very unlikely to be a fake because it has a sheen in one corner and you can see it has a pretty heavy brush stroke,” said Ninow.

“Goldie painted the primer layer on the canvas in a pattern and then applied a fairly heavy varnish. The fact that it is there suggests that it is an original. “

Ninow said the last time the original item was sold was on another auction house for $ 280,000 in 2012.

If it were a fake, paintings like the works of the famous con artist Karl Sim would cost hundreds of dollars, but they are not “treasured” works.

“It’s worth a lot more now, well over half a million dollars. I’d have to see it in the flesh to really get an idea of ​​its value, but you’re seeing a price between half a million and just under a million. “

An antique watch was stolen.

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An antique watch was stolen.

The rise in prices was due to fewer and fewer Goldie paintings being put on the market, he said.

“It’s amazing investments that keep rising and rising every year. Most of the people who buy them are not buying them to sell them to make a profit. “

The stolen painting by Ngāti Maru and Ngāti Paoa boss Hori Pokai was made in 1933 when Goldie was 63 years old.

Goldie’s most expensive piece, A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, by Wharekauri Tahuna, head of Ngāti Manawa, sold for $ 1,337,687 at auction in Auckland in 2016.

“It’s a huge amount of money to invest in and the family may have bought it because they really loved it and it would be devastating if it were stolen. I can’t imagine how the family is doing. “

He said that when paintings are stolen, “they tend to go underground” because “nobody in the art world touches them”.

A bronze sculpture that was recently stolen in a robbery.

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A bronze sculpture that was recently stolen in a robbery.

In addition to being a loss to the owner, he said, when a work of art is stolen, be it from a public or private collection, the greater loss is that it comes from “Aotearoa, our culture and our nation.”

“The cultural heritage is not only lost because it was created by a famous artist, but it is Tikanga Māori and embodies the spirit and soul of the sitter.

“I hope you find it.”

Police said art theft was on the rise after finding more than 30 pieces of art stolen from several homes in the Coromandel area in recent months.

The police are now appealing to the public for information or possible sightings of the man’s painting and other works of art.

In addition to the Goldie, numerous other unique works of art and antiques were stolen, including a cutlery set by Koch and Bergfeld.

Police have asked the public to call 105 and quote file 210103/2961 or Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111.

Although original 19th century works by artist Charles Goldie sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars, forger Karl Sim, who copied many of Goldie’s works, changed his name to CF Goldie and kept painting.

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